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Faith is important to me., My thoughts about Mental Health, Virginia Pillars

20/20


“They say hindsight’s 20/20” These words from a country western song sung by Randy Travis in 1982 ring in my head.

My last post talked about hygge and the need to embrace the situation in the best way you can. This hits home today even more. Hubby and I have pretty much practiced this for the entire year to date. I’m saddened the rest of our country had to join us because of covid 19.

If you’ve read the previous blog, you know we canceled the first part of our trip in January due to hubby’s illness. After he felt well enough to travel, we drove to a warm location for the second half of our vacation, still in place. We arrived at the destination at our rental property on the day our lease began. The morning of third day into our eight-day vacation, he fell. And yes, he seriously injured himself. We spent the next three and a half days in the local hospital. Since he has a three month recovery time, the entire month of February and the first two weeks of March have pretty much been spent in our home. Except for necessary excursions. You know, things like doctor appointments, medication and grocery runs, and church. (For us, Mass is a necessity.)

So, how will I look back at this year in the future. Will my vision be 20/20? Will I see how things worked together? Or will I scratch my head and say, “I don’t get it.”

I want to be able to look back and say, “I did the best that I could. To me, this means I reacted in a loving manner. I purchased only the things we needed in our immediate future and left items on the shelf for the next family. I reached out to those in need with my concern and support. I kept my eyes focused on my end goal of life – heaven. I prayed for those around me. I prayed for wisdom and strength to face the things to come. I asked our Lord to dwell in me and use me to make His presence known during this time of confusion and inconvenience. I asked Him to have mercy on me for the things I’ve done or things I’ve failed to do.”

I’m using this time to read, to write, and take care of my mental, physical, and spiritual health.

Embrace your current situation. Care for yourself and others around you in the most loving way you can muster. Look to the future with hope. I’m praying for you.

My thoughts about Mental Health, Virginia Pillars

The Flu, Hygge, and Almond Biscotti


We (hubby and I) planned a trip several months ago. Mid-January, we would fly to west and spend time with a special cousin and her husband. Then, we’d hop on another flight and go spend a few days with an aunt, uncle, and their family in another area on the west coast. After a few days with them, we’d fly to Florida and spend time with friends who winter there.

Sounds like a perfect plan for two people who are of “near retirement” age, doesn’t it?

Unfortunately, life has a way of throwing curve balls into the best laid plans of mice and men. Hubby got the flu. Not Influenza A or B, just some generic version with the same, nasty symptoms.

This past Sunday, he developed a headache. By Monday, the fever, chills, and body aches invaded. On Tuesday, we canceled our flight to the west coast. Now, I could wail and gnash my teeth, but what good does that do for my emotional health? Nothing.  So, I am taking each day as it comes.

Enter a “new to me “ concept covered in our Seasonal Affective Disorder discussion during a recent NAMI support group – hygge. (pronounced “hoo-gah”) It’s a concept from Denmark and Norway. The people in these countries adopted this lifestyle to help cope with the long, cold winter with limited daylight hours. I would describe hygge as a conscious effort to surround themselves with the things that make life good. Such as a secure, content mindset focusing on friendship, laughter, plenty of light, a hot cup of coffee or tea, a warm blanket, and rest when tired.

Basically, it’s an awareness to enjoy the moment. I can see a lot of good coming from adopting this mindset year-round.

Since my travel plans dissolved yesterday, I decided to practice the art of hygge. I can’t change the fact that we have to stay home. Nope, can’t. Disappointed? Yes. I decided to foster a sense of well-being for myself. I ate my last treat yesterday, so I decided to bake a batch of almond biscotti. I love to savor a biscotti with my afternoon latte. Most purchased ones use sugar and wheat flour and I try to avoid both. Therefore, I’ve been tweaking a recipe for almond biscotti for several months. I think I’ve almost got it the way I want. First, I substituted almond flour for the wheat flour to lower carbs. I also changed the sugar amount by using 2/3 erythritol (sugar alcohol) and a scant 1/3 white sugar. This lowered the carbs even further. Why do I want to lower the carbs? My body doesn’t process them very well and I battle blood sugar fluctuations. Mostly, it dips too low. I feel so much better since I significantly reduced my intake of carbohydrates.

Back to the almond biscotti. They were like “Mary Poppins” – practically perfect in every way. They just got a little too brown. I think I need to lower the oven temperature for the final bake. (Biscotti requires two sessions in the oven.) I hope one more attempt and then I’ll master it. When I do, I’ll post the recipe on my blog. Stay tuned.

And in the meantime, consider the idea of hygge for yourself. Accept what life throws at you. Find things that make you feel secure and content. Take care of yourself. And count your blessings.

Bye for now.

My thoughts about Mental Health, Virginia Pillars

Bad days happen


Yesterday, a post on UpJourney published. What to say when someone is having a bad day.

I am always grateful when my thoughts get included in articles designed to help. Here’s my submission to the article:

When someone is having a bad day, it’s important to acknowledge the feeling they are having

First, mention that they don’t seem like themself. Then, listen. And listen some more as you pay attention to what they tell you. It’s helpful to repeat what they said so they know you heard what they said. This validates them and they know you really heard them.

Acknowledge their feelings by saying, “I’m sorry things feel hard right now,” or “That must feel scary or whatever emotion they shared.”

Encourage them to talk about it with someone they trust

If you have established trust with them, it may help them if you affirm you want to help them. “I’m here for you,” or “I’ll listen if you want to talk,” gives them permission to name the reason they are having a bad day. The person may not want advice, so don’t offer it unless they ask for it. Questions can help them sort things out as they talk. Some examples are:

  • “Has this happened to you in the past?”
  • “Did anything help you handle it then?”
  • “Is there something I can do to help you?”

If each answer is negative, follow up with, “I’m here for you,” or “I’m here to listen if you want to talk about it.” Sometimes, people just need someone to care about them and listen without trying to fix their emotions.

Virginia Pillars

If you’d like to read the entire article:

What to do when you know a friend is having a bad day.

Faith is important to me., Virginia Pillars

Take God along


We spent last weekend in Branson, Missouri. We left Iowa on Friday morning and arrived later that day. Yes, we drove and drove. No, we didn’t stop at ANY quilt stores in Hamilton, Missouri. (Next time. Next time.)

We watched the production, The Miracle of Christmas at the Sight and Sound Theater on Friday evening, The Bretts on Saturday morning, and the Hughes Brothers Christmas Show on Saturday night. All of them uplifted me and centered me on Christ during this Christmas season.

For our lunch on Saturday, we decided to eat at a 50’s style diner with singing servers. The line to get in stretched out well past the door. Groups of people huddled together as they eagerly listened for the hostess to call out the magic number that gave them admittance. At one point, the call came for a party of four. I quipped loudly, “We’re a party of two, but if anyone wants a larger party, we’d be happy to join them. We might not know each other when we sit down, but we will by the end of the meal. “This brought laughter. And to my surprise, an invitation came from a couple of strangers to join them at their table to make us a party of four. We shared a meal, snippets of our lives, the importance of family, and our faith. Do not neglect hospitality, for through it some have unknowingly entertained angels. Hebrews 13:2

After our meal, we parted ways to explore the little shops that surrounded the diner. We met again in several stores and both of us commented on what a nice time we had.

Before we left the area, I decided to explore one more little shop. Roy dutifully followed me into the warm, welcoming atmosphere. We looked around and before we left, the owner of the store greeted us. Within a matter of seconds, she shared a bit of her story with us. In turn, I shared tidbits of mine which caused her to exclaim, “God wanted you in my store today. Not for you, but for me!” She went on to explain some of her struggles and through that brief encounter we shared ideas, how to react with love, and ways to hang on to Jesus in the midst of the storm. We parted with hugs and uplifted spirits. We offered each other encouragement. Brothers, I ask you to bear with this message of encouragement, for I have written to you rather briefly Hebrews 13:22.

I’m sure glad God never takes a vacation. And I’m grateful I took God along with me on mine.

Virginia Pillars, Virginia's Reviews

Sharing Love Abundantly in Special Needs Families book review


I gave this informative book five stars. I’d read the original 5 Love Language book by Dr. Chapman and thought the authors did a great job of applying the principals to people with special needs. First, it helps the reader determine what is their primary love language within the beginning chapters. I think it is important to understand the concept because it makes it easier to put it into practice. The book gave wonderful examples of families who incorporated love language in their home. I found the advice and suggestions spot on. I’d recommend this book to anyone who has a person with special needs in their life. I’m grateful to the authors for providing me with an ARC.

My thoughts about Mental Health, Virginia Pillars

To medicate or not to medicate? That is the question.


I hope Shakespeare fans don’t roll their eyes because I changed his famous quote from Hamlet. It fit my thoughts perfectly today.

Yesterday, a photo of my book, Broken Brain, Fortified Faith posted to a group I belong to on Facebook. Below the photo, the moderator added a synopsis of our story. In one of the comments, I read a negative opinion about medications. This helped me remember that we don’t all agree that medicines help someone with mental illness. The person who posted the comment seemed against them and listed their reasons.

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My opinion is different. And since this is my blog, I will share my thoughts about medication and mental illness. I believe the correct medications helped my daughter get her life back.

In 2004, my adult, college-educated daughter, Amber began to act differently from her usual self. It quickly spiraled into a world of fear for her as paranoid thoughts overtook her. At first, I thought it would pass. It didn’t. Instead, it got worse and worse. Eventually, she lost the ability to communicate with us.

It wasn’t until we got her into treatment with a psychiatrist (M.D. with additional education in psychiatry) that things improved for her. He diagnosed her with schizophrenia. He prescribed medicine and recommended therapy. We moved her back home. I helped her manage the medications and took her to see a counselor until she felt well enough to do it for herself. This treatment plan helped her brain form the proper connections again and I saw improvement come at a slow, but steady pace. It took several years of her hard work and patience but she regained her independence.

I believe the medications that Amber took then and still takes today are the reason she lives a life similar to other people her age. At one point, while under the care of her psychiatrist, still in our home, and in therapy twice month, she stopped taking the anti-psychotic medication. The symptoms that plagued her earlier returned with a vengeance. This convinced Amber (and me) that she needed the medication.

Today, she works full-time, lives on her own, and manages her illness with ongoing treatment while she leads a busy social life.

Since this happened in our family, I like to read about scientists who study the brain and what occurs during mental illness. Brain imaging helps them track the processes both with medication and without. They continue to discover new treatments such as magnetic therapy as well as the effects different medications have on the molecular processes in the brain. I live with the hope that through research, treatments become even more effective with fewer side effects. If you want to learn more about medications, the National Institute of Mental Health discusses medications, what they do, and the side effects caused by using them.

Faith is important to me., Gratitude, Virginia Pillars

Update to What’s Next?


One comment to yesterday’s post reminded me of a truth I needed to hear, “as GOD writes the next chapter of your life. HE has a plan for you….” It didn’t take long for that message to sink in.

Only minutes after I clicked Publish, my phone rang with my mom’s number on caller ID. This sends up a red flag each time she calls. She turns 93 next month and lives in an assisted living home near me. I see her several times each week. As I conclude each visit, I remind her, “Call me if you need or want anything.” She rarely calls. So when she does, I go.

Yesterday, she had a concern and I assured her I’d be there in 20 minutes or so. Because my hubby knows I’m a baby on wintery roads, he offered to take me. And because I appreciated his offer, I accepted.

It wasn’t an emergency, but it caused my mom to feel apprehensive. I’m grateful she reached out to me. Together, we came up with a solution that I think will ease that worry for her. Four hours later, hubby and I went home.

My lesson in all of this? I don’t need to know what’s next. I need to stay open every day to where I can serve God. When I write, sew, clean the house, wash laundry, or spend time with my mom, if I do it with love and to the best of my ability, this is how I can serve God.


As each one has received a gift, use it to serve one another as good stewards of God’s varied gracee 1 Peter

I know God will turn the pages to reveal the next chapter in my life as I continue to serve him.

Bye for now.

Virginia

Faith is important to me., Gratitude, Virginia Pillars

What’s next?


I don’t know. This journey called life has lots of curves and I’m on one now. I think I’m experiencing the proverbial empty-nest syndrome. Granted, my youngest child graduated from high school twenty years ago so maybe I’m a late bloomer. Back then, I charged ahead with my embroidery business that I had started five years earlier. It doubled in size over the next year. I had no time to think about what to do. For the next twelve years, I expanded, hired part-time employees, and filled my days from early morning until late at night. I didn’t have time to lament about the change from ballgames, after-school chats, and endless laundry to a quiet house day after day. My in-home business supplied me with a steady stream of conversation partners.

In late 2004 through 2009, my business shifted to focus on my daughter to help her through mental illness to achieve recovery. Business limped along until it could return to full speed ahead as she moved on with her life. By 2010, it was back to busy, busy, busy.

In 2008, I had an inkling to explore writing after two strangers suggested I write our story. It shocked me. I hadn’t considered this as an option for my life. Me, a writer? I jumped in and spent time with other writers. I learned so much from them. I gradually shifted my focus from a full-time businesswoman to part-time business owner and part-time writer. I took fewer orders and returned to my original business plan of a one-woman show. During 2015-2018, I spent more time writing, speaking, and social media interaction than I did with embroidery. I intended for my business to fade away a little each year.

It worked. After twenty-five years, my embroidery orders are sporadic instead of multiple ones each day. The doorbell stays silent and the machines beg for my attention. This resulted in a feeling I haven’t experienced before – empty-nest syndrome. If I’m honest, I miss the excitement that came from another order, a box of clothing to embroider or the companionship from customers. I’ve learned a huge lesson about me. I liked the uber-busy pace I kept for the last forty-four years. I always had a to-do list each day, a revolving door of people (I’m an EXTROVERT) and the satisfaction of feeling needed.

So what’s next? I don’t know. Last fall, I sent a book proposal for a daily devotional to a publisher. A few weeks ago, I received a “This doesn’t work for us at this time” email. I fell into a slump for a few days. I moped around the house and noticed the empty rooms, the lack of people, and wondered what to do.

I don’t want to stay in this frame of mind. Since I don’t know what’s next, I set some goals. As I place my trust in God to show me the next step, I’ll pray and:

  • Sew each day. This relaxes me when I create something from a piece of fabric.
  • Join a group that sews for charity. This helps me be around people plus I can give back using one of the gifts God gave me.
  • Write a reflection each day and pray for discernment: should approach a different publisher, self-publish, or post it on this site for anyone to read?
  • Organize things that got neglected for the past twenty-five years as I managed my business.
  • Eat nutritious food and walk more. I want to send those endorphins to my brain to help me have a more positive attitude.

I appreciate your prayers as I write the next chapter of my life.

Bye for now.

Virginia

My thoughts about Mental Health, Virginia Pillars

A time to weep, and a time to laugh.


January 9, 2019

This morning, as I drank my coffee and read my devotional books, one of them had a reflection on Ecclesiastes 3:4,  A time to weep, and a time to laugh;  a time to mourn, and a time to dance.

Fourteen years ago, I went through a time when I forgot how to laugh. Life had heaped stress upon stress upon me as our daughter battled the symptoms of schizophrenia. She didn’t act like the daughter I knew and loved. Uneducated, I didn’t know how to deal with it, so I worried. The more I stewed, the more the life-giving human emotion of laughter floated away from me out of my reach. I had a choice before me: wallow in my misery or change my situation. I chose the latter.

First, I educated myself about the brain and what my daughter endured -what she could face in the future. Once I had a basic understanding of this, I moved forward so that when a humorous situation happened, I could once again catch it and tuck it away to lift my spirits in the days to come.

As Roy and I checked Amber into the third hospital in six weeks, the nurse asked her where she lived. “Here,” Amber said as she glared at the woman.

“No, I mean before you came here.”

“Covenant, ” Amber said defiantly. (We had just transferred Amber from Covenant, a hospital near our home town.)

Roy laughed. I snickered. The tense feeling that made my palms sweat and my heart race eased for just a moment. Amber’s answer, meant to protect her personal information from this stranger, had a lot of truth behind it. She had indeed spent her last few weeks living at Covenant. Her flippant answer showed me that schizophrenia hadn’t stolen Amber’s personality. It was still there.

Let me explain. In our home, laughter, sarcasm, and affection mingled to form a foundation as solid as the concrete in our basement walls. Roy and I met as teenagers and had built our relationship on shared laughter and faith. As our children grew up, affection mixed with sarcasm became a part of their personalities. To see this snippet still there in Amber gave me hope. Even though parts of me wept, I had a moment when I laughed.

A time to weep, and a time to laugh. I could continue to move forward.

Faith is important to me., Gratitude, Virginia Pillars

A look back, a look ahead.


January 4, 2019past present future

My house still looks like Christmas. Decorations adorn the mantel, the lighted trees still bring a smile to my face, and the nativity sets remind me why I celebrate Christmas. I bask in the joy of the season until January 6, the feast of the Epiphany when my faith remembers the three wise who came bearing gifts for the infant, Jesus.

I remember a past Christmas as I look to the new year ahead.  Now, I see it with clarity. I understand why things happened the way it did. I can see how my actions affected the situation. Let me explain.

Fourteen years ago, the joy of the Christmas season eluded me. Our daughter lived in the clutches of schizophrenia as her brain betrayed her. She lived in a world of paranoia, fear, and confusion. We’d moved her back home with us, but we didn’t understand what she faced. Our Christmas celebrations teetered between explosive and devastating as her brain disorder caused her to fling unfounded accusations at family members. Fears of a disjointed family unit swirled in my thoughts. Would our family unit survive? How do we survive?

We sought help from others who’d walked a similar path before us. We didn’t turn against each other. Instead, we worked together to find her the treatment and support she needed. Friends and family lifted our spirits as they assured us of their prayers as they visited us and Amber when she spent weeks in a hospital, brought her small gifts, and someone even brought a casserole to lighten our load.

As I look back, I know God worked through them and we weren’t alone, even though I felt like it.  Over the next few years, Amber learned about her illness, accepted it, and the treatment she needed for long-term recovery.  Fourteen years later, and I continue to thank God for the miracle of her recovery. She works full-time, has a social life, and makes me proud with her determination to give back to the world around her.

Because of my experience, I developed a new purpose. I want to reach out to other families caught in the snares of mental illness. I want to walk beside them and give them hope. This month, support groups resume in our area and I plan to attend the sessions. Together, we can learn more about the brain and how to help our loved ones – and ourselves in the process.

In a quest to grow as a person, I set some goals for 2019:

  1. I continue to write a daily devotional book where I deal with mental illness. In it, I think about Bible verses and the lessons I’ve learned about faith as I struggle with the messiness of life.  I strive to steady my gaze on the Lord and invite readers to join me. I don’t know if a publisher will pick it up. I hope it happens. Plan B and Plan C bounce around in my head if it doesn’t.
  2. Last year, I started my first novel. I vowed to finish it this year. I’m excited to see how the story ends.
  3. My TBR (To Be Read) pile looms above me on my bookshelf by my chair. My list to read this year includes biographies, fiction, and spiritual enrichment.  Nonfiction/Biographies: Crazy by Pete Early; Fiction: a couple of  novels by Lisa Wingate that I picked up at a yard sale, Lilac Girls by Martha Hall Relly, Orphan Train, and Last Girl Seen by Nina Laurin; Spiritual Enrichment: Thomas Merton, Miracles in Our Midst,  Having a Mary Heart in a Martha World, Having a Mary Spirit in a Martha World, and several books of prayer reflections. When I read a variety of authors, I learn more about the craft.
  4. Last month, I started on an organization spree for my house. It’s something that no one else notices, but it sure makes me feel wonderful to have nooks and crannies in a neat order. I plan to continue until I make it through each closet. It may take more than this year, but I’ll stay calm and carry on.
  5. I want to improve my stamina. My children gave me a wrist device to check my steps, etc. I get up and walk when it tells me I’ve sat too long. My last goal for 2019 is to meet the daily challenge it gives me in steps and stairs. So far, so good. Only 361 days to go.

Thanks for stopping.

Bye for now.

Virginia

 

My thoughts about Mental Health, Virginia Pillars

Mother’s Day 2018


_I'm glad that I'm her mom!Tomorrow is Mother’s day. I’ve celebrated this day for the past forty-two years. My first-born arrived the day after Mother’s Day that year, but I wore flowers that morning to church in anticipation of the upcoming event. That year, hubby had finished planting corn on Mother’s Day afternoon. As we visited his mom that evening, I announced that I planned to have the baby that night before he had a chance to start planting beans on Monday. I hadn’t started labor, I just made a flippant remark. Little did I know that labor would begin in a few hours – ten days before my due date. I held our newborn son the following afternoon after twenty-four hours of intense preparation.

Over the next six years, two more brothers and a sister joined in our yearly celebration of Mother’s Day.  I am quite biased, but I think all four of them are amazing people. I’m proud of each of them for their compassion and caring attitudes for others and the goals they’ve each worked hard to achieve in their adult lives.

Last year, I wrote about my feelings about my journey with my daughter as she battles mental health issues. I still say, “Happy Mother’s Day to me! I am so grateful for my four children.”

I felt honored when The Mighty chose to post it for Mother’s Day.

 

 

My thoughts about Mental Health, Virginia Pillars

May is National Mental Health Awareness Month


IntoMH-MHM-Twitter-HeaderDuring May, in honor of National Mental Health Awareness Month, I hope to inspire, inform, and get others involved in a topic that affects us all. I want to link to websites with the latest information about research, along with previously released webinar links.

I plan to post reviews or links to other blogs that discuss books, both fiction and nonfiction on the subject of mental illness.

I also hope to link to blogs that review my own story of my journey through mental illness with my daughter, Broken Brain, Fortified Faith .

I hope to accomplish this twice a week.

I hope you’ll join me as I work to bring awareness to a subject that I think is the elephant in every room. You know, the one everyone knows about but no ones wants to mention.

Let’s talk. Come join me. Bring your friends.

For more information on mental illness visit:

NAMI National Alliance on Mental Illness

Brain & Behavior Research Foundation

 

 

 

Faith is important to me., Virginia Pillars

Worst. Easter. Ever?


Not for me.

Today, Saturday, the day after Good Friday, I imagine many of us feel like the followers of Jesus after his death. They were filled with fear as they stayed in their homes. They didn’t know what would happen to them. The world as they knew it, crushed. So much like many of us today. We don’t know what’s next. Those who go out, the essential workers who do their jobs knowing they could be the next victim – do they experience the feelings of His followers who stood at the foot of the cross fearful about their future? I know I would.

I think 2020 will do down in everyone’s personal history story. The is the year we couldn’t attend church services throughout most of Lent.; the first year for many who didn’t get to sing or play their instruments during Holy Week services.

I don’t remember how many years I’ve played my guitar and sang with our choir for Good Friday and Easter sunrise services. Taylor, my guitar, sits and waits for me pick her up sometime today or tomorrow. So, how will I handle this lack of community?

This year, for the first time in my sixty-five years of living, I will celebrate Easter Sunday Mass by watching it online in my living room. But –  I think this is my first church community, just like the early Christians. I believe Jesus is here in this place, my home.  When He commissioned His disciples, He told them, “…And behold, I am with you always, until the end of the age.” Matthew 28:20. I can, and will, worship Him here. And I pray for the grace to continue long after this time of isolation is passed.

How will I do this?

First, I hope to follow my daily routine of rising in the early morning. In the quiet house, I spend the first minutes with a cup of coffee and my God. I read through several devotionals for the day, write my reflections or make notations in my journal that I want to remember. I pray. I worship. I ask for guidance for my day. (I know, not everyone is an early riser. I encourage you to find a time that works for you.)

Second, I attend to the needs of my home. Whether it’s laundry, cooking, baking, sweeping the floors, I spend some time on household chores.

Third. I sew. With the need for masks, I spend a good chunk of my time in my sewing area cutting, stitching, and pressing. Then, I give masks to whoever I know needs one. Hubby owns five so he can wear a fresh one each day as he goes outside to do his farm work. I’ve passed them along to friends in healthcare, my local hospital, my mom’s residential facility, the UPS driver, and the person who delivers our mail. Suddenly, I went from a fabric hoarder to being prepared. I have finally been able to use fabric scraps for a wonderful purpose. Today, I’m sewing again for our local hospital.

I also take comfort in the Bible verse from Mark. Jesus had gathered with His disciples for a meal when a woman entered the room. She went to Jesus and poured expensive perfumed oil (Nard) on his head. When the disciples criticized her for wasting the money that could have been given to the poor, Jesus stood up for her. “She has done what she could;” Mark 14:8.

The reason I cling to this is I believe we each have gifts or skills that can  help another person. I see so many people “doing what they can.” And joy fills me as I use the talent God gave me to do what I can. I encourage each of you to find what you can do, to worship in your home, and to pray for all those affected by Covid-19.

No, I won’t spend time with my family or my friends. But, I can find joy in what I can do. I hope you can, too.

Bye for now.

May it be your Best. Easter. Ever.

My thoughts about Mental Health, Virginia Pillars

The Golden Rules for Postpartum Depression


Your support mightbe the difference

August 16, 2019

Postpartum depression – sometimes refrerred to as “Baby Blues” can affect up to 1 in 5 women. It’s upsetting to the new mom who questions, “Isn’t this supposed to fill me with joy?”

It gets hard to get out of bed. Guilt feelings arrive. Am I a terrible mom? More guilt feelings. Exhaustion. You want to cry all the time. And the negative emotions pile higher and higher.

What can we (family or friends) do to help?

WholeMamas.com asked me to write an article for loved ones who want to support a woman suffering from this. I entitled it, The Golden Rule for Postpartum Depression. It’s my one of my goals – to strive to treat others as I wish to be treated. This article posted on July 25, 2019.

Thanks so much for stopping.

Bye for now,

Virginia